Neuroscientist explains the same concept about the brain to a 5-year-old and then a grad student

https://youtu.be/opqIa5Jiwuw

Bobby Kasthuri is a neuroscientist at Argonne National Laboratory. In the video he was asked to explain what a connectome is to 5 different people; a 5 year-old, a 13 year-old, a college student, a neuroscience grad student and a connectome entrepreneur.

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Antarctica Had a Terrifying, Pleasant Day [Corrected]

Photo: Getty

Here in New York City, it was a beautiful spring day with temperatures hitting 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Life was good, and it almost made you forget all the troubles the world faces at the moment. Then, you find out that it was basically the same frickin’ temperature in Antarctica this time last year and the planet is screwed.

On March 24th, 2015, an Argentine research base experienced temperatures of 63.5°F according to an announcement from the U.N. weather agency that was circulated by Reuters today. It was the highest temperature ever recorded for the Antarctic continent, defined by the World Meteorological Organization as “the main continental landmass and adjoining islands.”

Spring has arrived early for much of the United States this year, and that is problematic. Disease carriers like mosquitoes get a head start, crops can be effected by the sudden return of frost, allergy sufferers get hit hard, and scientist’s anxieties are jumping off the charts.

But none of those problems compare to the potential troubles that could come if climate change ends up causing Antarctica to melt. In the worst case scenario, sea levels would rise by 200 feet and pretty much all previous problems on Earth would seem trivial.

In slightly comforting news, a higher record temperature was set in 1982 for the whole Antarctic region, which is considered anywhere south of 60 degrees latitude. On January 30th that year, Signy Island in the South Atlantic experienced a very refreshing 67.6°F day. So, it’s not like this is unprecedented but all trends indicate that things will just keep heating up.

Correction 10:20PM: This article has been updated to clarify that the record was set last year. We regret the error.

[Reuters]

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IoT based Temperature monitoring system

Hello everyoneToday I am going to design an IoT(Internet of Things) based room temperature monitoring system.Here I will use esp8266 to connect to the internet. Things Required 1) Arduino UNO (Any arduino board)2) ESP01 (esp8266 family)3) LM35 (Temperature sensor) Setting thingspeak account A…
By: Adil95

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Coded: new documentary series on hackers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EC2aOG1xDg4&feature=youtu.be

Seth Godin sends us this trailer for Coded, a new documentary series on hackers: "There’s an invisible war being waged. And we’re all part of it. Foreign governments are hacking major corporations. Major corporations are collecting massive amounts of consumer data. And the NSA is listening…to everything. But a new generation of programmers armed with powerful technology is rising up and fighting back. Freethink presents a new original series: Coded."

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DIY Home Automation With ESP8266 (Linknode R4) and Amazon Alexa

Over the last year or so I have became captivated with anything and everything ESP8266 related, and rightfully so. This little WiFi module is everything I have been hoping for in a development board for years. It’s small and compact, and has built in WiFi, as well as several GPIO lines, and is Ardui…
By: Charles J Gantt

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Paper centrifuge can help detect diseases in developing nations

A piece of paper, some twine and plastic could make testing for certain diseases more accessible even in the poorest areas of developing nations. Manu Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford University, used those materials to create a simple centrifuge alternative that he calls the "paperfuge." Centrifuges are rapidly rotating machines in the lab that scientists use to separate the different components of a liquid by density. If you want to test for diseases like African sleeping sickness, malaria, tuberculosis or even HIV, that liquid is blood. Heavy red blood cells settle at the bottom, plasma floats to the top, while parasites and pathogens occupy the middle part. The machine is effective, but it’s also expensive and needs electricity to work.

According to the bioengineer, he was inspired by a whirligig toy that spins as you pull the strings. Upon examining the toy with a high-speed camera, he found that the disc in the center rotates at 10,000 to 15,000 rpm. So, he did what any curious scientist would do: he developed a prototype and attached a small container of blood on its disc. After it successfully separated the blood’s different components, he and his team worked on the prototype further until they came up with an iteration that can rotate at 125,000 rpm.

They were able to find malaria parasites within 15 minutes of spinning the new prototype in the lab. Since they used an orange dye to stain the parasites, they were easily able to identify their presence under a microscope, as well. However, they still need conduct further tests to make sure it works as intended, so they’re now using the paperfuge prototype on the field in Madagascar.

Source: Stanford University, Nature

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Dog Bag Holder #3DThursday #3DPrinting

dog-bag-holder

mzemba shares:

This is an original design based mostly on philwaud’s concept. I wanted more secure threads without the slit extending through the top, so this is what I came up with.

The hole is intended so you can “clip” the bag into the top or bottom recess. Also, it’s easier to feed the bags through the hole before you put the spool in rather than trying to fish them out through the hole.

download the files on: http://ift.tt/2g2ydNB


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

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